Family home shows market trends

Hillsborough has traits that make it very different from the San Francisco housing market, according to Pacific Union real estate agent, Susan Ring. And as she markets a home on Knightwood Lane, she’s running into several of them.

First difference: in San Francisco, where the view is king, higher position on a hillside means higher property values. But in Hillsborough, where the high points of the hills are located near Interstate 280 with its noise, and far away from the shops and schools further east, the lower stretches of the hillsides command the bigger price tags.

“The point in Hillsborough is if you get too close to the freeway, you’re too far away from everything,” Ring said.

The Knightwood house, a six-bedroom ranch built in 1956 and expanded in the 1960s, is in those lower stretches. It’s located west of Broadway, close to the Burlingame Country Club. But the housing market is cooling, and Ring said she recently lowered the asking price from $2.95 million to $2.85 million. She considers the price low, given the expansive nature of the home and its large lot.

The property is owned by an 85-year-old woman, the wife of a San Francisco attorney, who raised five children there, Ring said. Her furnishings are in the home, and that’s another difference between San Francisco and Hillsborough: people don’t stage houses in the suburbs, Ring said.

She’s a big advocate for staging, which she said helps the 30-somethings looking at houses imagine how to live.

“You bring in modern furniture, modern art, modern colors,” Ring said. “It’s like theater, creating a setting.”

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