Extend the F-Line throughout San Francisco

“Muni’s historic F-Line celebrates 20 years,”
The City, Sept. 20
Extend the F-Line throughout San Francisco

The key issue is the preservation and restoration of trains and their proper “housing” is needed to continue the F-Line.

What should be noted is the Geneva Car-Barn and Power-House, which is proper storage, vs. the Larkin open-air facility downtown. We all pay taxes and refurbished them, so they should run throughout S.F.

The Balboa Park Station Advisory Community suggested such an implementation and submitted a resolution to extend the historic streetcars back out to our neighborhoods to ensure we all can catch a trolley fairly and equitably by fixing looping and linking the existing transit lines and making sure these trains and their drivers have adequate track-runs.

This means taxation of business, housing and institutional growth at a high enough level to have the “foresight, and practical effort” to ensure the public can see and use these cars in the future.

Ed Reiskin is focusing on the short term, short routes, and not the longer road and costs we face.

We need the F-Line to the Golden Gate Bridge, out Sunset and up Sloat, along Van Ness, out the Mission and the Excelsior, and around the BVHP and the Geneva route to the edge of Daly City.

Don’t limit the view of the F-Line to one system, enlarge the view and broaden the financing to solve it.

A. Goodman
San Francisco

“Central Subway may lose site to luxury condors,”
The City, Sept. 23
Double-pay mistake

The City should have bought the Pagoda Theater site when it needed it for the extraction of the boring machine.

Instead they agreed to rent it for more than $100,000 per month. They would have been money ahead, instead of double-paying for the property.

Tim Donnelly
San Francisco

“Fleet festivities mark next step,” The City, Sept. 25
Nurses for 33 on Potrero

As a daily MUNI rider for 40 years and a nurse, I welcome all service increases. I’m particularly enthusiastic about increases to the 9R-San Bruno, but this increase in no way justifies the planned rerouting of the 33-Ashbury so that it will no longer stay on Potrero to go to San Francisco General Hospital.

Many seniors, people with disabilities and people who are low-income travel to SFGH on the 33 from the Richmond, Haight, Castro and Mission.

Moving the 33 will force people — many using walkers, canes, crutches and wheelchairs — to transfer to the 9, creating hardships for MUNI’s most vulnerable riders.

SFMTA, listen to the nurses: We prescribe keeping the 33 on Potrero.

Iris Biblowitz
San Francisco

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