Examiner goes pink to stand in solidarity

Examiner goes pink to stand in solidarity

You may have noticed the pink on the San Francisco Examiner logo on the front the paper and on our website for the past few days. It will remain pink for the whole month of October as a way for the San Francisco Media Company to promote Breast Cancer Awareness month.

At this newspaper and throughout our region, almost everyone knows someone who has fought breast cancer and many of us know people who have died from it. It is the second most common type of cancer among women in this country, behind skin cancer. Breast Cancer Awareness month, organized by a coalition of groups working to fight the disease and raise awareness, needs all of our support and participation. So for this month, our name will be pink in solidarity.

Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women get breast cancer and more than 40,000 women die from the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While rare, breast cancer can also develop in men — comprising less than 1 percent of cases.

Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 or older, but it also affects younger women — about 10 percent new cases of breast cancer in the United States are found in women younger than 45, according to the CDC.

Coloring our name pink for a month is our way of putting this issue front and center for our staff, our readers and for The City.

The CDC and advocacy groups advise that by getting mammograms regularly, women can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer, especially for those older than 50.

For a more complete set of facts on detecting and treating breast cancer, see www.cancer.org.

Michael Howerton is editor in chief of the San Francisco Examiner.Breast Cancer AwarenessMichael HowertonOctoberSan Francisco

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