Environmentalism requires research

“Toxic Dungeness crabs inspire climate change action,” Green Space, Nov. 11
Environmentalism requires research

After reading Robyn Purchia’s article about her willingness to “reduce” her consumption of meat and dairy so that Dungeness crab will be available in years to come, all I can say is that I am shocked that Ms. Purchia (an environmental attorney) apparently did not have a clue about the connection between the meat and dairy industries and climate change. This has been known for years! She doesn’t need to “scratch her head” and try to figure out what to do. She should immediately rent or buy and watch the excellent movie “Cowspiracy” and learn what we’ve been saying for many years: “The emperor has no clothes.” Oops, sorry. Meat and dairy are the No. 1 contributor to global warming! This is the elephant in the room that the environmental movement refuses to talk about.

– Animal agriculture is responsible for 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, more than the combined exhaust from all transportation.

– Livestock and their byproducts account for at least 32,000 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year, or 51 percent of all worldwide greenhouse gas emissions.

– Californians use 1,500 gallons of water per person per day. Close to half (47 pecent) is associated with meat and dairy products. Forget shorter showers — don’t eat meat.

– 2,500 gallons of water are needed to produce 1 pound of beef.

– Livestock is responsible for 65 percent of all human-related emissions of nitrous oxide —
a greenhouse gas with 296
times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide, which stays in the atmosphere for 150 years.

– Animal agriculture is the No. 1 polluter of water.

Don’t take my word for it — do your own research and you will find, Ms. Purchia, that the science is already here. Years ago, I had a button that said “Real Environmentalists Don’t Eat Meat.” That hasn’t changed, and it’s much, much worse now.

Worried about global warming, drought, water pollution? Good, so get out of your car, take shorter showers, compost away — but also do the research, get the facts and seriously think about drastically reducing, or eliminating, meat and dairy from your diet. You’ll be doing yourself, the planet and the animals a world of good.

Nadine May
San Francisco


“Speed the culprit in recent crashes,” In My View, Nov. 10
Speed just one issue

Not mentioned by Nicole Ferrara were the narrow sidewalks that limit the passing of groups of pedestrians while attempting to maneuver around trees, Muni and light poles, baby carriages, skateboarders and bikes, and the panhandlers with their hands out, occupying the few benches provided by businesses.

Nor the messes that dogs make, and the containers of the homeless who drop their food and glass bottles on the sidewalks and in the gutters.

With bicycle lanes on many streets, and many without, why are there not similar speed laws common to both modes of transportation? Perhaps on many streets, cars should be barred. This may reduce the parking spaces; however, with fewer cars there will be fewer car break-ins, which seem to be an epidemic as of late.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

“Consensus outstanding around park funding measure,” The City, Nov. 12
Prioritize the news

I almost missed Joshua Sabatini’s very timely article in the San Francsico Examiner about the Park Charter amendment heard at Rules Committee that same day. There was no mention on the Examiner’s front page to alert me to this important article, and I was not really interested to read about Ms. Doda.

Lucky for me, I decided to peek inside to see if anything newsworthy was actually in the paper — and there was. I attended this meeting and was better prepared because of the report.

Next time, please let us know that valuable journalism is in your paper by featuring the topic somewhere on the front page.

Nancy Wuerfel
San Francisco

“Whatever happened to environmentalists?” The City, Nov. 8
Native plants matter

Give native plants a chance. Check out the oak grove in Golden Gate Park, the top of Mt. Sutro, Lands End, Fort Funston, Sunol, Ohlone, Mt. Diablo and so many other areas where native plants dominate.

The trees, shrubs and grasses are not only beautiful. They fix carbon, recover from fire and are perfectly suited to our current environment. Best of all, they support so many kinds of animals, including endangered animals. The native plants are better than eucalyptus, ivy and other aliens.

Don’t mistake the barren areas left after overgrazing as what native plants look like. There is no comparison. PLEASE, go look at the real thing. I know you’ll change your mind.

Bettie Holaday
San Francisco

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