Enjoying safer streets throughout The City

A typical weekend outing turned into a love affair with my city.

After stopping at the Inner Sunset farmers market and a neighborhood bakery, my husband and I biked to a friend’s house for lunch.Not only did we get to ride in new bike lanes on Kirkham Street (which go all the way to the ocean), we were also able to bike all the way from downtown to the Sunset district on streets that had bike lanes.

I felt so much safer and confident riding on these streets and know that they also make it easier for everyone to share the road. How wonderful that our city is investing in making streets safer for everyone.

Teri Merritt, San Francisco

End identity politics

America’s class warfare began after the Civil Rights Act was signed when Democrats altered the intent of affirmative action from “outreach” to preferences.

The blatant use of race quotas at UC Berkeley prompted the anti-quota initiative Proposition 209, endorsed in 1996. Prop. 209 is law — a civil rights law prohibiting race-based preferences. But in the socialist-entitlement mind-set, all public institutions must reflect the ethnic composition of the area.

Gov.-elect Jerry Brown filed a brief that would overturn Prop. 209. It was struck down by the courts. My advice to Brown: It is time to stop advancing identity politics, as that only creates wider ethnic divisions among California’s diverse people.

Philip Melnick, San Francisco

Knowing the facts

If Homeland Security Department chief Janet Napolitano’s interview comment that the government is “working … 364 days a year to keep the American people safe” instills little confidence, how about President Barack Obama’s top aide on intelligence, National Intelligence Director James Clapper, being unaware in another interview of the arrest in London of 12 men accused of plotting an al-Qaida-inspired attack?

Sounds like both Napolitano and Clapper work on the same national security team as the administration’s gaffe leader, Vice President Joe Biden.

Jim Hartman, Berkeley

Punishment fits crime

I am glad that Andrew Gallo, who killed Los Angeles Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart and two others in a drunken driving accident after running a red light more than a year and a half ago, got a stern sentence — that of 51 years to life in prison.

It is about time habitual drunk drivers are punished severely.

Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Huntington Beach

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