City ready to comply with pipeline work

In response to your article (“CPUC, S.F. waging street fight,” Friday), I want to make it clear that the Department of Public Works has never denied or prohibited PG&E from performing urgently needed work. Safety is a top DPW priority and we collaborate with PG&E and other agencies to ensure the well- being of San Francisco’s residents.

Major work such as pipeline replacement is routinely coordinated between all utility companies and city agencies through the Committee for Utility Liaison on Construction and Other Projects. This process minimizes disruption due to excavation work in the public right of way. Also, PG&E has not complained to DPW nor indicated that the moratorium is prohibiting it from providing safe utility service. On the other hand, with our coordination, inconveniences to residents and businesses caused by multiple excavations is limited while still providing San Franciscans with upgraded utilities and smooth streets.

Mohammed Nuru
Department of Public Works director
San Francisco

BART Plus users still pay

I was a little confused by Will Reisman’s article on the BART Plus pass (“BART Plus may be minus Muni,” Wednesday).

The phrase “free transfer” was used repeatedly, and I don’t feel that phrase is correct. My husband and I both use the $74 BART Plus pass to commute between our home in South San Francisco and our jobs in San Francisco. On the $74 pass (purchased twice per month), you get $50 of BART fare. That makes an additional $48 a month that we believed was offsetting the cost of riding Muni or SamTrans in addition to taking BART.

These transfers are not free — we are paying for them with every BART Plus pass.

If Muni and SamTrans back out of accepting BART Plus, the additional commute costs will force us to back out of using public transit and put at least one more car on the road.

Diana Shatswell
South San Francisco

Muni needs 4-car trains

I quite agree with letter writer Jamie Whitaker’s thoughts about transit in the area (“Game plan needed for new arena traffic,” Letters, Wednesday). Another BART subway is out of the question at this time, but why doesn’t  Muni just run four-car trains?

During the initial testing period before the train service opened, I saw a four-car train near Ninth Avenue and Judah Street one time. What is the reason for not doing so now?

Boston, running similar equipment, at least operates three-car trains, and that is in stations that are shorter in length than Muni, which has platforms that are the same length as BART platforms. It doesn’t make sense to me.

Irving Q. Waldorf
San Francisco

Keep newspaper unbiased

I’ve noted a distinct move to the left since the new owner of The San Francisco Examiner came on board. I hope you don’t lose sight of the balanced coverage that makes any newspaper worth reading.

Why not consider what the Atlanta Journal-Constitution newspaper does? Rather than only feature lefty Mike Lukovich’s cartoon each day, it also features a right-leaning cartoon.

Whatever you do, please don’t ever lose Melissa Griffin’s “emperor’s got no clothes” approach to local politics and shenanigans. She’s the most astute political analyst you have on staff!

Ann Grogan
San Francisco

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