Bicyclist in fatal crash should face justice

On July 15, a bicyclist ran a red light and hit a New York woman who was legally crossing with a green light. She died of the injury on Aug. 11. There is still no action by the district attorney three months later.

A police spokesman said that the bicyclist would face the same legal consequences as a motorist. However, there has been much delay with the police investigation, coroner report and toxicology report.

The story did not get much attention because the victim was from out of town. Had a car caused the death or had she lived in San Francisco, authorities would have investigated this matter much quicker.

One wonders where justice is for this woman who visited San Francisco and ended up dead. I wonder why nobody seems to care. Is the district attorney waiting until after the election as to not offend bicyclists?

John Burton, former state senator, San Francisco

 

Still suspicious of BofA

I am relieved that I can suspend a decision about closing my Bank of America accounts now that it dropped its proposed debit card fee. Not only did BofA leave San Francisco and go to the South, it got massive bailout money and then recorded massive profits.

It was BofA that originally encouraged customers to use debit cards instead of writing checks or clogging teller lines, and then further encouraged the card use with a “keep the change” program that rounded up to a dollar our change from purchases and deposited it into our accounts.

This ability to be two-faced with loyal customers tells me they likely have another trick up their sleeves that we will soon be hit with.

Andrea O’Leary, San Francisco

 

Burlingame is doing well

Responding to those who question Burlingame’s financial health, I want to stress that our city’s finances are in excellent shape, and we are addressing pension obligations responsibly. Our sales and hotel taxes increased 28 percent and 29 percent between 2009-10 and 2010-11.

In addition to the new Safeway, many other stores are opening. Nissan alone is expected to bring an additional $100,000 in sales tax revenues to our city each year. And Virgin America anticipates creating 500 new jobs annually for the next few years.

We are tackling the issue of escalating pension obligations by negotiating with city workers to increase their contributions to the system, and ending old practices that promised employees unsustainable pensions and retiree health benefits.

Terry Nagel, mayor, Burlingame

letters to the editorOpinion

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Japanese American family at heart of beloved Golden Gate Park garden

The Japanese Tea Garden, the oldest public Japanese garden in North America,… Continue reading

Coronavirus cruise ship passengers head to California military base for quarantine

LOS ANGELES — American passengers evacuated from a cruise ship in which… Continue reading

Kicking off the budgeting process with the School Planning Summit

Last week I shared some information about SFUSD’s budget. I mentioned how… Continue reading

SF Lives: A ‘poverty scholar’ gives visibility to homeless people

Houseless, landless and unhoused are the preferred terms of Gray-Garcia and the people she’s aligned with in the POOR Media Network.

The racial contours of our housing crisis

Black residents of Midtown apartments deserve ownership

Most Read