Bicyclist in fatal crash should face justice

On July 15, a bicyclist ran a red light and hit a New York woman who was legally crossing with a green light. She died of the injury on Aug. 11. There is still no action by the district attorney three months later.

A police spokesman said that the bicyclist would face the same legal consequences as a motorist. However, there has been much delay with the police investigation, coroner report and toxicology report.

The story did not get much attention because the victim was from out of town. Had a car caused the death or had she lived in San Francisco, authorities would have investigated this matter much quicker.

One wonders where justice is for this woman who visited San Francisco and ended up dead. I wonder why nobody seems to care. Is the district attorney waiting until after the election as to not offend bicyclists?

John Burton, former state senator, San Francisco

 

Still suspicious of BofA

I am relieved that I can suspend a decision about closing my Bank of America accounts now that it dropped its proposed debit card fee. Not only did BofA leave San Francisco and go to the South, it got massive bailout money and then recorded massive profits.

It was BofA that originally encouraged customers to use debit cards instead of writing checks or clogging teller lines, and then further encouraged the card use with a “keep the change” program that rounded up to a dollar our change from purchases and deposited it into our accounts.

This ability to be two-faced with loyal customers tells me they likely have another trick up their sleeves that we will soon be hit with.

Andrea O’Leary, San Francisco

 

Burlingame is doing well

Responding to those who question Burlingame’s financial health, I want to stress that our city’s finances are in excellent shape, and we are addressing pension obligations responsibly. Our sales and hotel taxes increased 28 percent and 29 percent between 2009-10 and 2010-11.

In addition to the new Safeway, many other stores are opening. Nissan alone is expected to bring an additional $100,000 in sales tax revenues to our city each year. And Virgin America anticipates creating 500 new jobs annually for the next few years.

We are tackling the issue of escalating pension obligations by negotiating with city workers to increase their contributions to the system, and ending old practices that promised employees unsustainable pensions and retiree health benefits.

Terry Nagel, mayor, Burlingame

letters to the editorOpinion

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Changing zoning in San Francisco neighborhoods where single family homes prevail is crucial in the effort to achieve equity. (Shutterstock)
To make SF livable, single-family zoning must be changed

Let’s move to create affordable housing for working class families

Most Read