Assange as dangerous as any suicide bomber

I find it absolutely unbelievable that each and every United States citizen is not as outraged as I am over yet another attack on the security of the USA and its allies by the criminalistic Julian Assange and his subversively dangerous website, WikiLeaks.

I’m not sure who my anger should be directed at the most — the dastardly Assange, or my own U.S. government for not putting a stop to this terrorist before the release of such secret sensitive information. Yes, I call this monster a terrorist because he is just as dangerous as any unknown suicide bomber.

He and his entire WikiLeaks staff should already be behind bars for their last assault on the safety of Americans. The disclosure of those documents has not only placed our soldiers’ lives in more danger, but it will ultimately bring more danger to you and me.

If the federal government feels impotent to stop the actions of this lethal organization, then we should, by way of the FBI and CIA, make public the names, addresses, automobile models, license plate numbers, phone numbers, frequent hangouts and names of family members of all those  involved.

Let them see how it feels to have their personal safety compromised!

Barry Bradley, San Francisco

Hennessey’s the one

I’m for Ken Garcia’s solution in Thursday’s San Francisco Examiner as for who should be our next Mayor: Sheriff Michael Hennessey.

I’ve voted and been for Hennessey since I was a law student at Hastings in the early 1970s and knew him then as the husband of Sandra Blair (now ex-spouses for many years), my student colleague who is still a distinguished family lawyer in the East Bay.

She and he had, and have, some smarts. Which is why Garcia says Hennessey won’t get the job. Seems like nothing rational in this city ever flies.

Ann Grogan, San Francisco

Shared responsibilities

People expect perfection from others but are often negligent regarding their own actions and thus will mostly say they are not guilty of an action due to unintended consequence, or an act of nature.

PG&E has the largest gas and electric infrastructure in California and the nation. Miles of electric lines and natural-gas pipes supplying millions of customers in highly populated and built-up areas where it takes many years of planing and permitting for projects to go forward to the construction stage.

A perfect infrastructure would take a high expenditure, and likely at a cost that few could afford, thus preventing economic growth. A natural-gas pipeline exploded in a crowded neighborhood that mostly was developed long after the pipeline was constructed.Is a failure of a 50-year-old pipeline (“Details in works for PG&E trials,” Thursday) in earthquake country under a residential neighborhood just a PG&E responsibility, or a shared responsibility of the utility, the city and the regulatory authority, of a pipe owned by the ratepayers of California?

Frank Norton, San Francisco

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