Ambrose: N.Y. policy promotes illegal immigration

New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer is so intent on doing good without first thinking things through that it’s inevitable he will do incredible harm. He’s clearly on the way with his recent move to dish out driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants.

Maybe, of course, he was motivated less by charitable impulse than political opportunism, for, of course, labor unions and immigration groups are already offering up hand-burning applause.

But let’s take him at his word and figure his concern is that lots of illegal immigrants need to drive to get to work and elsewhere and that many are doing it illegally. Illegal drivers are five times more likely to have fatal accidents than legal drivers, his administration says, and, what’s more, the illegal immigrants don’t have insurance for their cars, driving up the cost of premiums.

Through this new policy achieved through executive dictate, Spitzer says, you can bring illegal immigrants out of hiding while also obtaining legislation establishing a state residency requirement and thereby keeping illegal immigrants from flocking to New York for licenses denied them in all but eight other states.

If Spitzer and his advisers stopped to reflect for a moment, they’d realize that drivers aren’t mostly more dangerous because they lack licenses but because of the reasons they were denied licenses in the first place. It might also occur to them that large numbers of the illegal immigrants might figure that buying auto insurance on their low wages isn’t exactly the happiest state of affairs they can imagine if they’ve managed to avoid the purchase in the past.

For those who do want the license — a great enabler in all kinds of pursuits — there will obviously be ways to fool the state about their residency. Let’s remember that illegal immigrants are practiced in such deception. The chance is that New York will become a magnet for still more illegal immigrants than the half-million or so who live there now, and if those of us in other states don’t mind that so much, we do have cause to care about a policy that was once adopted and then rejected in another huge state, California.

For, as the father of someone killed in the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center has pointed out, most of the hijackers were aided in their evil by driver’s licenses, just as future terrorists could be aided in their murderous mayhem by the Spitzer policy. Hey, it’s illegitimate to use that argument, Spitzer reportedly told reporters, and maybe he thinks it similarly unfair to note that policies showering illegal immigrants with various benefits can have other adverse consequence for people in the country legally.

If Spitzer really wants the roads safer, the auto insurance issue less a headache and to improve the lives of the citizens of his state, he should join in discouraging illegal immigration in every decent way he can. It’s not a draconian idea, but a benevolent one, for many of the illegal immigrants are exploited here. Instead of scoffing at federal law, Spitzer ought to respect it.

Examiner columnist Jay Ambrose is a former editor of two daily newspapers. He may be reached at SpeaktoJay@aol.com

Op Edsop-edOpinion

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

School district, teachers reach tentative agreement on distance learning

With less than two weeks until the start of the school year,… Continue reading

Boudin, Gascon defend NFL in controversy over Stephon Clark video

Public service announcement prompted pushback from California prosecutors association

State bill would allow families of police brutality victims to seek compensation

A group of state and local officials on Thursday joined two family… Continue reading

Retired officers seek end to decade-old age discrimination case

Retired officer Juanita Stockwell was 60 when she and her colleagues first… Continue reading

San Francisco schools estimate $25m needed to close digital divide

Private donations being sought to fund internet access, technology

Most Read