Opinion

From left, Gabriela López, Alison Collins and Faauuga Moliga were sworn in to the Board of Education on Jan. 7, 2019. The election date for their possible recall is Feb. 15, 2022. (Ida Mojadad/Examiner file)

The silver lining of San Francisco’s ‘recall fever’

Recalls are an expensive but valuable amplifier for everyday people

Opinion: As Americans question the capacity of their institutions to serve them effectively and people around the world voice growing doubts about democracy, it’s especially important that we strengthen our courts with the right mix of innovation and investment. (Flat Isometric Vector Illustration)

Opinion: California’s courts need updating

‘It’s important that we strengthen our courts with innovation and investment’

  • Oct 26, 2021
Big Lots! went big on help wanted signs as signs around the region are getting the cold shoulder from workers reluctant to resume service-industry jobs in Moreno Valley on July 5, 2021. (Photo by Terry Pierson, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG via CalMatters)

Newsom glosses over California’s sluggish recovery

But employment data says otherwise

  • Oct 26, 2021
Alison Collins, pictured in 2019, is one of the three San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education members facing a recall election in February. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>

SF’s bumbling school board members get the recall election they deserve

Parent frustration boils over in effort to oust controversial leaders

Alison Collins, pictured in 2019, is one of the three San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education members facing a recall election in February. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
What makes “Dune” more than an ordinary space opera are two things: its subtlety and the richness of its world-building. (Courtesy photo)

Krugman on Dune: Analyzing sandworms and social science

‘Former bookish 14-year-olds finally have the Dune movie we wanted to see’

  • Oct 26, 2021
What makes “Dune” more than an ordinary space opera are two things: its subtlety and the richness of its world-building. (Courtesy photo)
Giants pitcher Logan Webb in his huge batting helmet smacks a triple at Oracle Park in April. How can he see out from under that? <ins>(Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)</ins>
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Online witches, Giants trolling on Instagram and Facebook’s Simpsons slip-up

News and notes from San Francisco’s tech world

Giants pitcher Logan Webb in his huge batting helmet smacks a triple at Oracle Park in April. How can he see out from under that? <ins>(Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)</ins>
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The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)

What Biden’s Build Back Better bill would mean for San Franciscans

Not much compared to other places — because The City already provides several key features

The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)

Google and Amazon employees criticize $1.2 billion cloud services contract with Israel

‘We can create a world in which tech companies can thrive without doing harm’

  • Oct 22, 2021
A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)
The Clement Street Farmers Market is popular among residents in the Richmond. (Clara Mokri/New York Times)

San Francisco’s many “15-minute” neighborhoods

Why The City is an urban planner’s dream

The Clement Street Farmers Market is popular among residents in the Richmond. (Clara Mokri/New York Times)
While some pedestrians enjoy walking on the car-free Great Highway, others, who drive to work, want the road reopened full-time to vehicles. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)

Converting the Great Highway into a Great Walkway makes no sense

It’s helpful to take a detailed look at the environmental and transit effects

While some pedestrians enjoy walking on the car-free Great Highway, others, who drive to work, want the road reopened full-time to vehicles. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
FILE — In-N-Out Burger, the popular California fast-food chain, is resisting San Francisco's public health rules that require indoor diners to show proof of vaccination. (J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times)

When it comes to San Francisco vaccine rules, In-N-Out should heed Biblical advice

Burger chain’s vaccine fight distracts from its tasty burgers and French fries controversy

FILE — In-N-Out Burger, the popular California fast-food chain, is resisting San Francisco's public health rules that require indoor diners to show proof of vaccination. (J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times)
“Empanada Lady” Paula Tejada, Chile Lindo owner pictured at her shop in the Mission District in 2018, is pleased that The City has relaxed regulations around outdoor dining and drinking during the pandemic. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)

In the time of COVID, San Francisco’s soul is in the hands of all of us

Denise Sullivan has written 100 Examiner columns and is still not done

“Empanada Lady” Paula Tejada, Chile Lindo owner pictured at her shop in the Mission District in 2018, is pleased that The City has relaxed regulations around outdoor dining and drinking during the pandemic. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>

Walgreens says it’s closing five SF stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten city leaders about crime’s effect on business

  • Oct 20, 2021
The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Illustration via iStock

Clean water in California is overdue

Forty-nine years ago this week, Congress passed the federal Clean Water Act

  • Oct 19, 2021
Illustration via iStock
Protesters demonstrate in San Francisco against a ballot initiative that would allow Uber and Lyft to continue classifying drivers as independent contractors in October 2020; after Proposition 22 passed, a California judge ruled so-called gig economy companies violated the state Constitution.
Jim Wilson/New York Times

For Uber and Lyft, the rideshare bubble bursts

Piece by piece, the mythology around ride-sharing is falling apart

  • Oct 18, 2021
Protesters demonstrate in San Francisco against a ballot initiative that would allow Uber and Lyft to continue classifying drivers as independent contractors in October 2020; after Proposition 22 passed, a California judge ruled so-called gig economy companies violated the state Constitution.
Jim Wilson/New York Times
In a recent poll of Bay Area residents, a slight majority said they are likely to leave the region, mentioning high living costs and deteriorating quality of life. <ins>(iStock/CalMatters)</ins>

Post-pandemic California: Comeback or decline?

COVID-19 has brought social and economic changes that may be permanent

  • Oct 18, 2021
In a recent poll of Bay Area residents, a slight majority said they are likely to leave the region, mentioning high living costs and deteriorating quality of life. <ins>(iStock/CalMatters)</ins>
The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>

How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
“Muslim women are seen as belonging to an external or opposing culture,” according to Basima Sisemore, a UC Berkeley researcher who drafted the report “Islamophobia Through the Eyes of Muslims.” (iStock)

Islamophobia undermines and weakens women’s rights

UC Berkeley study reports on the Muslim American experience

“Muslim women are seen as belonging to an external or opposing culture,” according to Basima Sisemore, a UC Berkeley researcher who drafted the report “Islamophobia Through the Eyes of Muslims.” (iStock)
Teresa Moore’s Muni project tests students’ ideas about San Francisco and how they see people around them. (Photo courtesy @reenanas via Twitter)

Race, equity and why attention remains the rarest and purest form of generosity

An introduction from new Examiner columnist Teresa Moore

  • Oct 15, 2021
Teresa Moore’s Muni project tests students’ ideas about San Francisco and how they see people around them. (Photo courtesy @reenanas via Twitter)
<strong>Gov. Gavin Newsom and state lawmakers are at odds over the best use of $4.2 billion remaining from Proposition 1A, a $9.95 billion bond issue for high-speed rail funding that California voters approved in 2008.<ins> (Image by NC3D via Flickr/CalMatters)</ins>

Newsom, lawmakers tussle over bullet train funds as costs keep rising

State legislators see shorter-term local projects as better use of 2008 bond money

  • Oct 14, 2021
<strong>Gov. Gavin Newsom and state lawmakers are at odds over the best use of $4.2 billion remaining from Proposition 1A, a $9.95 billion bond issue for high-speed rail funding that California voters approved in 2008.<ins> (Image by NC3D via Flickr/CalMatters)</ins>