Young motorcycle rider remembered after fatal crash

A large, drooping, purple orchid sent in condolence sat Wednesday on the front step of 28-year-old Christopher Seal’s parents ‘house, a home on a quiet cul-de-sac only about a mile from the site of his death the night before.

The Belmont resident was killed Tuesday evening when his motorcycle collided with a car on the 1300 block of Ralston Avenue, near Notre Dame de Namur University and Twin Pines Park, according to the Belmont Police Department.

As police continued their investigation of how the accident happened, family and friends were just beginning to cope with their loss.

A family friend dropped by Seal’s parents’ house Wednesday and said she had just heard of the accident. She said she was devastated.

Neighbor Frances Allen’s eyes grew wet when she heard about Seal’s death. She said her children grew up with Seal since they both moved into the neighborhood 22 years ago.

Her son, 18-year-old Louie Allen, said he’d just seen Seal park his motorcycle outside his parents’ home a couple days before.

“I always saw him helping his dad out with things in the garage,” he said.

Belmont Police Department acting Capt. Dan DeSmidt said there were “no obvious signs” that excessive speed, drugs or alcohol played a role in the fatal crash. He said Seal was killed despite the fact that he was wearing his helmet when his motorcycle collided with a car 6:54 p.m.

An off-duty fire officer was on scene when the crash occurred, but was not able to revive Seal, DeSmidt said. He described the scene as “pretty gory.”

Police closed off Ralston for hours after the crash, investigating what occurred.

DeSmidt declined to identify the car’s driver, but said the driver had cooperated with investigators. He also declined to describe exactly how the accident is believed to have occurred. He said the details of the case will be revealed as the Police Department continues its investigation in the coming weeks.

An autopsy was conducted on Seal on Wednesday, but a deputy coroner also declined to provide the results, pending further investigation.

Meanwhile, friends and family are still grappling with Seal’s death. After learning of the tragedy, Frances Allen searched for words.

“I’m so shocked,” she said. “He’s a really good guy. They’re a great family.”

kworth@examiner.com

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