Yahoo reps open wallets to cover shoppers' bills

Marieyi Dearaujo thought she had been swindled.

“There has to be a catch,” she told the stranger in the checkout line at the Mission district Foods Co. who paid her $59 grocery tab Wednesday.

“No catch,” said the man, who wore a purple shirt that read, “How good grows.”

It was not long before Dearaujo, 45, of San Francisco noticed that people in the same purple shirt had been standing in nearly every checkout line at the busy store. They were representatives from Yahoo, and they were paying up to $100 for groceries bought by shoppers — without a catch.

Sunnyvale-based Yahoo set out to spend $10,000 on groceries at Foods Co. on Wednesday to promote its nationwide random-acts-of-kindness program. The technology company wants to steer Americans to its website, kindness.yahoo.com, where folks can “update” their kind acts and learn the ripple effect they have created.

One of the lucky shoppers said she was a parking control officer, and that to pay it forward she would not hand out any tickets Wednesday.

Nicole Washington, 34, of Hunters Point paid only $48 for a full shopping cart of groceries after receiving the $100 gift. She said she could now buy food for the holidays she previously could not afford.

“God is good,” Washington said.

Most customers were so surprised that they repeatedly said, “Thank you.”

“You don’t have to whip out the wallet to be kind,” said Erin Carlson, a senior director for Yahoo! for Good. “You can pay for someone’s postage at the post office, buy gas, baby-sit for free, etc.

“We don’t want people to feel overwhelmed by changing the world. We are encouraging them to take that one simple act.”

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocalSan FranciscoYahoo

Just Posted

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. PHOTO COURTESY SALESFORCE
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins, a member of the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education, listens during a board meeting. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Is the Black Cat affair a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20? (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)
Club owners to maskless mayor: Are we the new fun police?

Black Cat affair highlights difficult recovery of nightlife industry

Passengers board a BART train at Powell Street station on Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Powell Station death serves as a grim reminder. BART doors don’t stop for anyone

What you need to know about safety sensors on the trains

Most Read