Jeff Chiu/APAn Asiana Airlines flight lands Tuesday at SFO

Jeff Chiu/APAn Asiana Airlines flight lands Tuesday at SFO

Wreck to remain at SFO during probe

All flights in and out of San Francisco International Airport during the next week will witness a grim reminder: The wreckage of Asiana Airlines Flight 214, which will stay on the grassy infield next to runway 28L until a federal investigation into the crash is complete.

The remains of the South Korean airline’s Boeing 777 — which crashed on landing Saturday, killing two of the 307 people on board and injuring more than 180 — will stay put next to other aircraft taking off and landing until National Transportation Safety Board investigators are finished scouring it for clues into the crash, agency spokesman Keith Holloway said Tuesday.

The remains of the aircraft could be removed “within the next week,” Holloway said, but no time frame has been released.

“We’ll capture and document any piece of evidence we need,” he said, noting that wreckage and debris are spread over a wide area near the runway.

Runway 28L, where the crash occurred, remains closed, according to SFO officials. The airport’s other three runways are open.

It’s possible that all or part of the plane could be removed to a secure location for the remainder of the investigation, Holloway said. If not, the plane will stay on the infield until the NTSB investigation is over and the plane’s remains are released to either Asiana or its insurance company for disposal, Holloway said.

Meanwhile, NTSB investigators will continue scouring what’s left of the plane as other aircraft — including different Boeing 777s, also flown by Asiana — go about their business.Asiana Flight 214Bay Area NewsSFOSFO crash

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