Mike Koozmin/The S.f. ExaminerCity workers Thursday prepare Civic Center Plaza and City Hall for a rally today to celebrate the Giants’ third World Series championship in five years. A parade begins at noon.

Mike Koozmin/The S.f. ExaminerCity workers Thursday prepare Civic Center Plaza and City Hall for a rally today to celebrate the Giants’ third World Series championship in five years. A parade begins at noon.

World Series parade will be crowded, shut down streets in SF

A sea of orange and black is expected to flood Market Street and downtown San Francisco on Halloween today, as Giants fans turn out to celebrate what has in the past five years become a biennial occasion — the World Series championship parade.

The parade, the third following championships in 2010 and 2012, will start at noon at Market and Steuart streets, head westbound on Market to McAllister Street and conclude at Civic Center Plaza and City Hall, where Mayor Ed Lee will honor the players behind what is being called a new legacy.

“The Giants have shown their magic once again as this improbable group of players refuses to quit,” Lee said in a statement.

Starting at 9 a.m., the parade route will close to traffic and Mission Street from The Embarcadero to Van Ness Avenue will be blocked as well until the Department of Public Works cleans the roads after the event. It is free to the public.

Despite rain in the forecast, Police Chief Greg Suhr said of anticipated attendance: “I can't imagine that we're going to have any less than 2012.”

“People estimate the daytime population in San Francisco to be well in excess of 1 million, so I wouldn't be surprised if we have a couple million people in San Francisco” today, he said.

The Police Department does not release officer deployment numbers, but Suhr said staffing will likely be up 20 percent along the parade route, while maintaining minimum numbers at The City's 10 stations.

“The parades have seen no major issues,” said Officer Gordon Shyy, noting also that in 2012 a shooting in the Tenderloin occurred as the celebration ended.

Public transportation is highly encouraged, with heavy traffic expected and parking at a premium.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency will supplement Muni service with six additional shuttles. To accommodate hundreds of thousands of Giants fans, BART will run its rush-hour service all day at maximum train lengths and frequency until 2 a.m. Golden Gate Ferry will also provide expanded service.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will provide free Hetch Hetchy drinking water at filling stations on the southeast corner of McAllister and Polk streets, northeast corner of Grove and Polk streets and midblock at 75 Fulton St.

Alcohol is not permitted at the event, Suhr said.

“We're a world-class city and we're totally a world championship city, and we need to act like that,” he said. “So if you're going to come to town to have a good time, come. If it's going to be more nonsense, stay home.”

Parade impact

The parade celebrating the Giants' championship will alter traffic.

Street closures that started Thursday night:

– McAllister Street (between Larkin Street and Van Ness Avenue)

– Grove Street (between Larkin Street and Van Ness Avenue)

– Civic Center Plaza and streets around and adjacent to City Hall

Street closures starting about 9 a.m. Friday:

– Steuart Street (between Howard and Market streets)

– Spear Street (between Howard and Market streets)

– Main Street (between Howard and Market streets)

– Market Street (between Steuart, First and 10th streets)

– Mission Street (between Van Ness Avenue and The Embarcadero)

Source: SFMTA

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