Workers may have struck a deal with hotels

A two-year standoff between San Francisco’s hotel workers and 13 of The City’s hotels came to a tentative end on Tuesday, with the two sides reaching an agreement that now must go before the workers for approval.

The agreement would apply to more than 4,000 hotel employees — including housekeepers, kitchen workers, food servers and bell staff — who are members of Local 2 of the hotel workers union, Unite Here.

The hotels, some of the largest in The City, have been bargaining under the umbrella name of the San Francisco Multi-Employer Group.

Contract negotiations began two years ago and came to a halt after the union called a two-week strike and the hotels responded with a lock-out. Mayor Gavin Newsom convinced both sides to go back to work, but no contractagreement was ever reached and the union has encouraged a boycott of the hotels ever since. More than a month ago, both sides went back to the bargaining table.

Officials on both negotiating teams agreed not to release details of the agreement until this morning, according to sources. Core demands from the union had focused on wage increases, pension improvements, job security in the event a hotel is sold, workload reductions, union rights at other hotels and health benefits.

beslinger@examiner.com

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