Work to start on Linear Park path

Consider it a super-highway for bikers, walkers and joggers through South San Francisco: Crews are preparing to break ground on Linear Park.

The path, named “Centennial Way” in honor of the city’s 100th birthday in 2008, will meander 3.1 miles through the city, connecting San Bruno’s BART station with South San Francisco’s.

Recreation and Community Services Director Sharon Ranals said construction would begin Monday on the first phase of the project — running from Orange Avenue south to Tanforan Avenue and Huntington Avenue — which will cost nearly $2 million to construct.

The initial portion should be completed by January 2008, and the remaining portions of the project should be completed by the end of next year to celebrate the city’s birthday, Ranals said.

The pathway — the culmination of work beginning in 1993 — will be physically separated from a roadway used by cars and designated for bike and pedestrian use. Bicyclists and pedestrians will enjoy a paved, 10-foot-wide pathway with a center line and 2-foot decomposed granite shoulders on each side.

The trail will be lined with native grasses and trees, and will run along an already worn path people use for walking or commuting to the BART station, Ranals said.

“All the way along the alignment you can see like a deer trail — people already use it,” she said.

The estimated cost of the entire project is roughly $6.5 million. The city has secured the funding mostly through federal transportation grants and is using developer fees to match government money, Ranals said.

The second and third phases stretch from Orange Avenue to Chestnut Avenue and from Chestnut to South San Francisco’s BART station.

Mayor Rich Garbarino said it had a been a “long difficult row we’ve had to hoe” in bringing the park to the city because of the multiple government agencies — including BART, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and CalWater — that the city has had to negotiate with for land.

“We’ve been steady and persistent and we’ve kept our noses to the grindstone,” Garbarino said. The park is there for the city’s leisure, whether a resident is a jogger, rider, or walker, he said.

Christina Robles, the marketing manager for the Shops at Tanforan, which sits next to San Bruno’s BART station at the southern end of the future park, said anything that makes it more convenient for the community to get around is a good thing.

“Convenience is always a key component to a successful business,” Robles said.

dsmith@examiner.com


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