Woo prevented from visiting surviving child surviving child

The estranged husband of the woman who killed her 3-year-old daughter has a restraining order that prohibits her from seeing the 4-year-old son who survived the alleged murder-suicide attempt, according to her lawyer.

In April, Linda Woo, 39, brought her children into the family’s Subaru Outback while it was still parked in the garage oftheir Ingleside home, and lit a barbecue grill.

Found unconscious by a neighbor, her daughter, Olive, was pronounced dead at the scene. Her son, Carter, survived, and is “fine,” said Woo's attorney, Stuart Hanlon.

Woo appeared silently in court in San Francisco for only a few minutes on Thursday, while Hanlon asked the court for more preparation time before starting a preliminary hearing.

Earlier this month, Woo entered a plea of not guilty to one murder charge and a attempted murder charge. Hanlon said they also plan to enter a plea on insanity.

“This case is about a mental defense,” said Hanlon. “We believe she was insane, legally and morally, and not responsible for what happened.”

Hanlon said Woo was under a psychiatrist’s care at the time of the murder. Although she was under suicide watch in the jail ward at San Francisco General Hospital until just a few weeks ago, she was recently transferred to a special unit at the San Francisco jail. She is taking antidepressants and is still receiving psychiatric treatment, Hanlon said.

While Woo has been allowed visits by family members, her estranged husband, Gavin Murphy, has not come to see her, and he filed a restraining order that prevents her from seeing her son, said Hanlon.

Woo and Murphy had been separated for several months prior to her alleged attempt to kill her children and herself.

Murphy was not at the house at the time of the incident. He did not respond to an attempt to reach him by email.

Woo is scheduled to reappear in court August 22.

beslinger@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco lacks housing data that would let it track rental vacancies and prices. New legislation is seeking to change that.<ins> (Photo by Joel Angel Jurez/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Landlords blast proposal to require annual report on rentals as invasion of privacy

Housing inventory could give city better data on housing vacancies, affordability

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Psilocybin magic mushrooms (Shutterstock)
‘Magic mushrooms’ moving into the mainstream

Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics could follow several different paths

The 2020 Census has concluded taking responses sooner than expected. (Courtesy photo)
What does California have to lose if undocumented immigrants are excluded from the census?

By Kim Bojórquez The Sacramento Bee If The U.S. Supreme Court rules… Continue reading

Most Read