Woman wanted for selling fake gold jewelry in South City

South San Francisco police are looking for a woman who sold a victim two fake gold chains in exchange for cash Sunday night.

According to the police department, around 8 p.m. the suspect knocked on the door of a residence in the 400 block of Commercial Avenue.

When a woman came to the door, the suspect said she had just moved to the United States from Mexico, was short on money and was trying to make some cash to feed her twin 8-month-old babies by selling gold jewelry she brought from Mexico.

The victim agreed to buy two gold chains with pendants for $180 each, and the suspect left, police said.

When the victim realized that the jewelry was not real gold, she searched for and located the suspect about a block away. The victim requested her money back, explaining that the jewelry was fake.

Police said the suspect claimed not to know the jewelry was not really gold and offered to return the cash. She then walked to the backyard of a nearby home after telling the victim to wait outside for her.

After waiting about 10 minutes, the victim searched the backyard and realized the suspect had fled.

Police described the suspect as a Hispanic female, with medium to large build, about 5-feet-4-inches tall with black hair in a ponytail. She was last seen wearing a black hooded windbreaker jacket, light blue jeans and white tennis shoes. It is believed she speaks little English. Bay City News

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & Courtsjewelrypolice

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