Woman killed in printing press, workers 'very shaken up'

Employees at a San Francisco printing company where a female worker was trapped and killed in a printing press today are “very shaken up,” San Francisco fire Lt. Ken Smith said.

Reports that the 26-year-old woman was trapped in a printing press at Digital Pre-Press International, located at 645 Mariposa St., were called in at 11:36 a.m., according to Smith.

Officials responded to the scene four minutes later and were able to manually release the machine and pull the trapped woman out, but the victim was unable to survive her injuries, Smith said.

The woman suffered head and chest trauma and was pronounced dead at the scene, according to California Occupational Safety and Health Administration spokeswoman Kate Macguire.

In additional to state health and safety officials, grief counselors were called to the scene to speak with the employees, according to Smith.

“It's going to be huge for these employees,” Smith said of the woman's accidental death.

The printing and lithography company where the incident occurred has not had any safety violations reported in the past five years, Macguire said.

Today's incident is the city's second fatal industrial accident in two days.

On Monday, Luis Gonzalez, 43, of Ceres, Calif., was crushed to death when a five-story high boiler collapsed at the former Pacific Gas & Electric Co. power plant located at 1000 Evans Ave.

The other two workers trapped beneath the boiler, also men, made it out alive and were being treated at San Francisco General Hospital, fire officials said Monday.

The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration launched investigations into both industrial accidents, Macguire said.

Any time there an employee suffers an injury in a workplace that requires at least one overnight stay at a hospital, state health and safety officials are required to investigate, according to Macguire.

The investigation includes determining what happened factually; whether any violations to health and safety codes took place and what may have caused or contributed to the accident; and whether changes need to be made to improve safety and prevent accidents from happening in the future, Macguire said.

Each investigation will most likely take two to three months, although the safety and health administration has up to six months to investigate according to California state law, Macguire said. — Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

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