Woman avoids prison in fatal hit-and-run

A 25-year-old woman accused of driving away after fatally striking a pedestrian in a San Francisco crosswalk days before Christmas will spend no time behind bars.

Novato resident Samantha Osborne pleaded guilty Tuesday to one count of felony hit-and-run and one count of misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter, according to the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. Two other counts were dropped.

She was sentenced to five years probation, six months home detention, 90 days in a work alternative program and 720 hours of community service, said Erica Derryck,  spokeswoman for  the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office. Osborne will have to submit to periodic searches by police and enroll in alcohol treatment and counseling.

Osborne struck San Francisco optician Gregory Anstett, 51, as he crossed Van Ness Avenue near Post Street on Dec. 23, according to police.

tbarak@sfexaminer.comBay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocal

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