Woman accused of robbing Alex Trebek won’t face life sentence

Hotel encounter: Lucinda Moyers said she was in the Marriott Marquis to meet a john

Hotel encounter: Lucinda Moyers said she was in the Marriott Marquis to meet a john

Prosecutors won’t be seeking a life sentence for the self-proclaimed lady of the night who allegedly burglarized quiz-show king Alex Trebek’s San Francisco hotel room in July.

Lucinda Moyers, 56, is scheduled to appear in court today for a preliminary hearing. She’s accused of breaking into the room where the “Jeopardy!” host and his wife were sleeping at the Marriott Marquis and making off with cash and other valuables July 26. She is charged with felony first-degree burglary and receiving stolen property.

Moyers, who has four prior burglary convictions from the 1990s, could have faced 25 years to life if convicted under California’s three-strikes law, which increases a prison sentence for someone convicted of a felony who has prior convictions on violent or serious felonies.

“We will not be pursuing that case as a third-strike case,” District Attorney’s Office spokesman Omid Talai said Monday. He added, however, that sentencing under the three-strikes law was still at the judge’s discretion.

Moyers has said she is a prostitute and had been trying to meet a john in a room in the same hallway where the Trebeks were staying, but she claims she never entered the TV host’s room.

The 71-year-old Trebek injured his foot while allegedly chasing Moyers out of his room. She was detained in the lobby by hotel security. Moyers is alleged to have taken $650 in cash, a bracelet and other items from the Trebeks.

Trebek will not be appearing to testify at today’s hearing, Talai said. A judge will determine whether there is probable cause to try Moyers on the charges.

If convicted, Moyers could still face a severe penalty — up to nearly 30 years in prison, according to Talai.

Moyers is being held in County Jail on $625,000 bail.

aburack@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & Courts

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