Westmoor may get new pool if city kicks in money

Plans for a new Giammona Pool at Westmoor High School may finally move forward when the city decides tonight whether to contribute $4 million to beef up expansion plans for the popular pool, after a six-month delay over discussions about the facility’s design.

Jefferson Union High School District allocated $11 million for the reconstruction of the aging pool as part of its $136.9 million renovation effort funded by a bond passed last year. The city’s $4 million contribution would increase the pool’s size and add amenities, such as a therapy pool and a shallow area for children’s swimming classes.

The district is only looking to add locker-room facilities, replace a damaged therapy pool and keep the size of the six-lane pool, District Supervisor Mike Crilly said.

The rusting facility built in the early 1970s is used both by the school’s students, including a 70-person swimming team, and the public.

According to City Manager Pat Martel, the needed money will not come from the general fund, but from residual funds left over from capital improvement projects and in-lieu fees from future developments.

“Having an indoor pool on a recreational basis is extremely important,” said Martel. “If the council doesn’t approve of funding sources and we’re not able to allocate the $4 million, we’ll have to be satisfied with the pool. But the size will not be conducive to swimming lessons and it would not accommodate recreational activities.”

Whether the pool size is expanded or not, Westmoor High School swimmer Jasmine Chao just wants the facility upgraded.

“Our pool is old and rusty and they put a lot of chlorine in it, so the water is not very bright,” she said. “I really wish we had more lockers and more showers and that the pool is cleaner.”

svasilyuk@examiner.com

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