Courtesy RenderingSan Francisco planners released an 800-page report and an additional 1

Courtesy RenderingSan Francisco planners released an 800-page report and an additional 1

Warriors unveil new SF arena design

The Golden State Warriors on Wednesday presented a new concept to the public for their sports and entertainment complex proposal just off the waterfront in Mission Bay.

Highlights include over 100,000 square feet of retail space that is heavy on food offerings; about 30 percent of the 11 acre site dedicated to public space; a viewing deck that looks over San Francisco Bay; space for offices, biotech and laboratories; underground parking for 950 vehicles; and 300 bike valet spaces.

The team is aiming to build the complex on the 11 acre space it acquired in April that is surrounded by Third, 16th and South streets and Terry Francois Boulevard.

“We believe this plan is a perfect fit for Mission Bay, for San Francisco and for the entire region,” Joe Lacob, CEO of the Warriors, said in a statement. “Our goal is to not only build a world-class arena for our team and our fans, but also create a vibrant place that residents and visitors will want to enjoy, whether on game days or any other day.”

David Manica of MANICA Architecture is the lead architect for the project, and architects for other elements such as the office buildings have yet to be announced but are expected in the coming months.

The Warriors anticipate playing their first season in the new arena in the 2018-19 season.Bay Area NewsGolden State WarriorsSan Francisco

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