Warriors release ground-level draft designs for new arena

Larry W. Smith/Pool Photo via APGolden State Warriors guard Andre Iguodala (9) shoots over Cleveland Cavaliers forward James Jones (1) during the first half of Game 4 of basketball's NBA Finals in Cleveland

Larry W. Smith/Pool Photo via APGolden State Warriors guard Andre Iguodala (9) shoots over Cleveland Cavaliers forward James Jones (1) during the first half of Game 4 of basketball's NBA Finals in Cleveland

The first street-level images of the future Golden State Warriors Mission Bay arena have been released to give the public a general idea of what the future project will look like.

The architectural drawings shown to a Mission Bay community group last week are not the final version of what the arena and its surroundings will look like, but rather sketches of the general idea.

Since the team abandoned plans for an arena on the water just south of the Bay Bridge, little but the location of the new site, a bird's eye view of the planned arena and a brief description of what will be located there had been divulged.

The arena itself, slated to be 135 feet high at its tallest point — a height that will need a variance along the waterfront — will seat 18,000 people, the same size as the former site along The Embarcadero.

Two 160-foot office towers will stand to the west of the arena and at ground level, anywhere from 55,000 to 95,000 square feet of retail space will be available.

Parking will be provided below ground in a 700-space lot with two access points on the north and south ends of the site. All arena-related functions will be accessible through the two entrances to the underground garage.

The $1 billion project, which will be financed privately, is slated to be ready for the 2018-19 NBA season.

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