Chase Center, the Warriors’ highly anticipated waterfront arena in San Francisco, is on pace to open for the beginning of the 2019-20 NBA season. (Courtesy Chase Center)

Chase Center, the Warriors’ highly anticipated waterfront arena in San Francisco, is on pace to open for the beginning of the 2019-20 NBA season. (Courtesy Chase Center)

Warriors arena plan back in court over effort to build in Mission Bay

Oral arguments are expected to be heard Wednesday in the appeal of a lawsuit seeking to block the construction of the Golden State Warriors’ new arena in Mission Bay.

The hearing in the California Court of Appeals comes as the project, which includes a new arena named Chase Center at Third and 16th streets, received its first pre-construction permit this week from the Department of Building Inspection.

The permit, for temporary shoring, was issued Monday, a department spokesperson confirmed.

SEE RELATED: SF judge rules against opponents of Warriors’ proposed arena in Mission Bay

That permit, along with others requested by project leaders, are considered pre-construction work because crews have not yet started construction of Chase Center, said PJ Johnston, a spokesperson for the arena.

“We are doing all the pre-construction work that we can do, including applying for principal permits and basically getting everything ready for when we can move to a construction phase,” Johnston said. “We will not set a groundbreaking date until the Court of Appeals has ruled.”

SEE RELATED: Warriors not champs but still shooting for new SF arena

A decision on the appeal is expected in the next several weeks.

The appeal followed an unsuccessful lawsuit challenging the validity of The City’s approvals for the arena. The Board of Supervisors late last year approved plans to build the arena across the street from the three new UC San Francisco hospitals, and in January, a group of former UCSF officials filed the suit alleging the arena will have devastating traffic impacts on the emergency services at the nearby hospitals.

UCSF, however, has endorsed the arena after city officials agreed to millions of dollars in transportation improvements, including more Muni light-rail vehicles and traffic officers, with revenue from the arena.

Also planned for the 11-acre site are restaurants, cafes, offices and public plazas, as well as a new five-and-a-half-acre public waterfront park.
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