Walsh service to be held at Monster Park

Bill Walsh will be remembered Aug. 10 at a public memorial service on the same home field that the legendary head coach led the 49ers to three Super Bowl victories, according to team officials.

Walsh’s family will hold the service at 11 a.m. at Monster Park, which was known as Candlestick Park when Walsh coached there. Coaches and players who worked alongside Walsh, who died of leukemia at his Woodside home Monday at the age of 75, will share their memories.

A video tribute prepared by NFL Films will also air. Parking will be free. Walsh’s family has requested that in lieu of flowers, fans donate to their favorite charity.

A private memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. a day earlier at Stanford Memorial Church, university spokeswoman Elaine Ray said. Walsh was twice a football coach at Stanford and helped shape the university’s athletic program.

Jason Jenkins, a 49ers spokesman, said team owner John York is working with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to approve a proclamation creating a Bill Walsh Day throughout California.

Jenkins said 49ers players will wear “BW” commemorative decals on their helmets during the upcoming season. Coaches will wear it on their shirts.

Walsh was one of only 21 coaches enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, team officials said. He went 102-63-1 in 10 seasons as head coach from 1979 to 1988 with the 49ers. He led the team to Super Bowl victories in the 1981, 1984 and 1988 seasons.

On the 49ers message boards, fans have been leaving a steady stream of condolences for Walsh, his family and his former team.

“R.I.P coach,” wrote one fan. “Prayers to you and your family. You have changed the face of football forever. Thank you very much for your lifelong passions in coaching, teaching, and then some. Most importantly, your own humanity that touched us.”

tbarak@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The most dangerous behaviors by drivers include failing to yield right-of-way at crosswalks, unsafe speeding and failing to stop at red lights or stop signs. <ins>(Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Changes at SFPUC spark concern, hope

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

A screenshot from SFPD body worn camera
New videos show police shooting man armed with knife, frying pan

Police say Antonio Estrada set fire to apartment building before shooting

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the Department of Public Health, said he expected San Francisco to enter the purple tier within days.
Chris Victorio/Special to S.F. Examiner
SF still in the red but expects move into purple tier ‘some time soon’

Four more counties moved into highest COVID-19 risk category by state

Most Read