Voters to decide if parking funds go to Muni

Voters will have a chance this November to decide whether to funnel more money into Muni and bestow more management powers to the agency that oversees the ailing transit system.

In a vote of 7-4 on Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors put on the Nov. 6 ballot the so-called Emissions Reduction and Transit Reform Act of 2007, which was introduced by Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin.

Under the proposal, Muni would receive an additional 40 percent of the parking revenue each year, for a total of 80 percent, which is expected to provide the system with at least an additional $26 million annually.

It would also change the salary-setting formula for Muni drivers. Drivers’ salaries would be calculated the same way, but a cap would be removed to allow for pay-for-incentives.

The proposal would also grant more autonomy to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency while decreasing the board’s influence over the agency.

The proposal also includes a parking provision that would not allow parking to exceed restrictions without a vote by at least nine members of the Board of Supervisors. It is a counter-measure to a charter amendment backed by downtown businesses.

Mayor Gavin Newsom withdrew his support of the measure because of the parking provision.

jsabatini@examiner.com

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