‘Visual pollution’ on public street furniture curtailed

San Francisco voters have said no to more advertising in public spaces.

Proposition E prohibits an increase in the number of general advertising signs on street furniture in excess of the number existing as of Jan. 1, 2008. Street furniture includes transit shelters, kiosks, public toilets, benches, newspaper racks and other structures on public sidewalks or places.

Supporters of the measure argued the restriction preserves the unique beauty of San Francisco — which draws tourism — and restricts “visual pollution.” Opponents said the measure was anti-business and prevents The City from benefiting from a sizeable revenue stream, especially during tough economic times.

“Restrictions on general advertising would affect the ability of some public agencies to generate additional revenue,” according to an analysis from the city controller. The Municipal Transportation Agency — which oversees Muni — collects about $15 million annually from advertising on transit shelters, and the restriction prevents the transit agency from expanding the amount of advertising.

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Thousands flood Mission District for youth-led George Floyd protest

As civil unrest over the killing of George Floyd continued Wednesday in… Continue reading

Vallejo police officer kills SF man after mistaking hammer for gun

A Vallejo police officer fatally shot a man suspected of looting who… Continue reading

Breed closes nearly $250M budget deficit in current fiscal year

Cuts include street repaving, firefighting hose tender trucks, childcare subsidies

DA drops charges against man seen in video of officer using knee restraint

Footage leads to calls for SF police to explicity ban move used in death of George Floyd

SF federal appeals court overturns U.S. EPA approval of herbicide made by Monsanto

The fact that the Trump EPA approved these uses of dicamba highlights how tightly the pesticide industry controls EPA’s pesticide-approval process.

Most Read