Victim dies in alleged DUI crash

A San Francisco man died early Saturday morning after a suspected drunken driver made an unsafe lane change and rear-ended the man’s motorcycle on the Bay Bridge, the California Highway Patrol said.

Ryan Willis Jones, 30, was headed eastbound in the tunnel just west of Treasure Island around 5 a.m. when he was knocked off his 2004 Harley-Davidson, the CHP said.

Jones was rushed to San Francisco General Hospital and died from his injuries less than one hour later, according to the San Francisco medical examiner.

Daniel Olivera, 31, of Oakland, was the driver of the 1998 Saab that struck Jones’ motorcycle, the CHP said. He was allegedly intoxicated and speeding when he made an “unsafe” lane change, causing the collision, the investigating officer said.

Olivera, who suffered only minor injuries, was brought to San Francisco County jail and booked on a felony DUI charge of causing bodily injury. According to the state’s DUI laws, he could face up to one year in prison if he’s found guilty of the charge.

The CHP shut down two eastbound lanes of bridge for about two hours to investigate the accident. No serious traffic delays were reported.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

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