Verdict set to be announced in Mission rape trial

Courtesy PhotoFrederick Dozier Jr.'s fate will be decided today when his verdict is announced.

Courtesy PhotoFrederick Dozier Jr.'s fate will be decided today when his verdict is announced.

Mission district residents will find out today if a vicious serial rapist is truly off their streets.

A verdict was reached Friday and is set to be announced this morning in the case of former school nutrition worker Frederick Dozier Jr., who is accused of dragging, beating, raping and robbing three women in three separate incidents last year.

Dozier is facing 26 charges in connection with the early morning assaults on June 17, Nov. 18 and Dec. 8. The attacks had the neighborhood on edge until Dozier was arrested Jan. 6 and later charged with the crimes.

Each attack occurred along 24th Street and within a mile of Dozier’s Treat Avenue home, prosecutor Marshall Khine said during the Oct. 23 opening statements in the trial.

The victim of the June attack was walking home from a friend’s place around 2:50 a.m., according to prosecutors, when she was grabbed from behind and dragged into a driveway near 24th Street and South Van Ness Avenue. The victim testified during the trial that she was pinned between a car and a wall and forced into oral sex after her attacker unsuccessfully attempted intercourse.

Each attack became more brutal, Khine said. The victim in the November incident was reportedly choked and punched after refusing the rapist’s demands. She was grabbed from behind at a bus stop near Potrero Avenue and 24th Street and dragged 146 feet along the sidewalk to a dimly lit spot against a parked car, Khine said, where she was sexually assaulted and robbed.

In the December incident, near 24th and Fair Oaks streets, prosecutors said a woman was choked unconscious after resisting her attacker. When she awoke, prosecutors said, she was being sexually assaulted. The attacker then reportedly punched her, slammed her face into the sidewalk and fled with her bag. The cut on her nose was so deep, Khine said, that cartilage could be seen.

DNA evidence linked Dozier to the crimes. Analysis reveals a “1-in-4 quintillion” chance that Dozier’s DNA is not a match to the semen found on the scarf of the first victim, Khine said. His DNA also was found on the second victim.

In a taped interview with a police detective at the time of his arrest, Dozier allegedly admitted to encountering all three women on the nights of each incident. During that interview, Khine said, Dozier downplayed the viciousness of the encounters and even claimed one of the victims had made a pass at him.

If convicted, Dozier faces life in prison.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

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