Update: Woman struck by N-Judah train at dangerous stop

The spot  63-year-old woman was struck by a Muni train on Judah Street was just a block away from where a pedestrian was dragged to death by a light-rail vehicles six months ago.

The woman, who was knocked to the ground and suffered a head injury at 30th Avenue, was sent to San Francisco General Hospital with life-threatening injuries, police said.

Police officials are still investigating how the N-Judah light-rail vehicle struck the woman, whose name was not immediately available.

The incident occurred at 8:51 a.m.

The driver of the train was tested for drugs and alcohol and placed on administrative leave following Wednesday’s accident, which is the standard protocol for operators, according to Muni spokesman Judson True.

Bus service replaced the light-rail line from 19th Avenue to Ocean Beach for about 50 minutes following the accident. Full service was restored at 9:42 a.m., according to Muni reports.

On Jan. 17, 40-year-old Mark Callaghan was struck by a Muni train on 31st Avenue and dragged three blocks on Judah Street to 28th Avenue. Following Callaghan’s death, several commuters who frequently used the stop said the intersection was a dangerous place to board the train.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

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