Union tries to put brakes on Muni restoration plan

San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency Executive Director Nathaniel Ford is confident the agency will implement Muni’s service restoration plans Saturday, although he admitted there are plenty of legal and procedural questions after the operators union filed an injunction.

The Transport Workers Union Local 250-A, which represents about 2,200 Muni operators, has filed a motion with the California Public Employment Relations Board for injunctive relief against the agency’s plan to restore 61 percent of its recent service reductions Saturday.

The union filed a lengthy grievance Wednesday with the state’s judicial-administrative body, saying that Muni management did not properly meet and confer with workers before moving forward with its service-restoration plan.

When a request is filed with the PERB, the group’s legal counsel has 120 hours to make a recommendation — a duration that does include the weekends, according to Les Chisholm, division chief for the agency. Chisholm said the state board typically acts fairly promptly.

Ford said he is not sure what will happen if the PERB does not rule on the injunction before Saturday. He said it’s also unclear what will happen if an appeal is filed on whatever ruling is delivered. Furthermore, there are questions about how binding the PERB’s rulings really are.

While he did not want to “get ahead” of the PERB’s decision-making process, Ford said he’s confident Muni acted correctly in moving forward with its plans for service restorations.

“We feel like we’re in a good position in terms of following the legal processes we need to follow to implement these service changes,” Ford said.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocalMuninat fordTransittransportation

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