UCSF, UC Hastings team up to develop new campus housing for students, faculty

Nearly 1,000 new homes for UC San Francisco and UC Hastings College of the Law students and faculty members could come to fruition in the next decade through a proposal to address the impact of The City’s housing crisis on the universities.

The universities announced Tuesday that they have signed a letter of intent to jointly develop new campus housing at the UC Hastings campus in the Civic Center and Tenderloin neighborhoods, providing between 535 and 970 new homes, along with the renovation of 252 existing units at the McAllister Tower at 100 McAllister St.

The homes would be available for graduate students, trainees and potentially faculty in an area of The City close to public transportation as well as businesses, restaurants and cultural and entertainment venues, university leaders said.

“This makes sense for our students and for our community,” UC Hastings Chancellor and Dean Frank H. Wu said in a statement. “This is a fantastic opportunity to collaborate with another UC campus that has a similar student body and equal needs for housing, while contributing to the Civic Center and Tenderloin area with students who will support small businesses in our community.”

There are 280 students in 252 units are currently housed by UC Hastings, while UCSF leases housing to some 462 students and 423 trainees. However, UCSF still faces a gap of up to 900 units, according to university leaders.

“The housing shortage is affecting every resident in this city, including university students,” UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood said in a statement. “As a result, a growing number of top-quality students are choosing to study somewhere else, which creates a tremendous loss of potential talent for The City.”

The universities propose to redevelop or renovate three properties on the UC Hastings campus.

The aging Snodgrass Hall, located at 198 McAllister St. and currently an academic building, would be redeveloped as housing, possibly along with an adjacent building at 50 Hyde St. Snodgrass Hall would be replaced with a state-of-the art educational facility at 333 Golden Gate Ave., also UC Hastings property.

The current student housing building known as McAllister Tower would also potentially be renovated. Shuttles that are already in place would provide transportation between the campuses.

The universities are exploring potential public-private partnerships for the housing, and an environmental analysis for the projects spearheaded by UC Hastings is expected to be completed next summer.

UC Hastings anticipates that its new academic building at 333 Golden Gate Ave. could be completed by 2020, while the first housing building at 198 McAllister could be completed by 2022. Renovations to 100 McAllister St. could be completed by 2025.campus housingdevelopmenthousing crisisPlanningstudent housingUC HastingsUCSF

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