Uber charges for donations to veterans, called ‘shameless’

Uber charges for donations to veterans, called 'shameless'

In an intended gesture of goodwill, Uber announced facilitated $5 donations to homeless veterans after each ride on Veterans’ Day.

Now that gesture is being called “shameless” on social media, as San Francisco-based Uber also collected a credit card processing fee of 25 cents for each donation.

“Uber claiming to support #Veterans and #VeteransDay by asking YOU to donate money and taking a ‘processing fee'” tweeted Kristof Puchner, of San Francisco.

“The people at Uber are shameless, really,” tweeted Matt Milsap, of Connecticut.

Many more social media posts lambasted the company.

To make the donation, those taking an Uber ride on Veterans’ Day were directed to touch the ‘VETS DAY’ slider on Uber’s app. When a ride is complete, riders were text-messaged a prompt to donate.

The bottom of the prompt to donate reads “*$0.25 OF EACH $5 DONATION WILL BE USED TO COVER PROCESSING FEES.”

In response to the vitriol, Uber released the following statement to the San Francisco Examiner: “”We understand that processing fees are a hot button issue. We thought long and hard about the best way to handle fees as we intend to do many more giving campaigns in the future where we will invite our riders to join in. We appreciate the generosity of our riders, and we’ll continue to be transparent about any fee.”

https://twitter.com/KristofPuchner/status/664535844573745152/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Uber did not recieve any revenue from the fee, it said on background, and fees are standard in taking donations.

Sage Lazzaro, a writer for The Observer online, criticized Uber for not taking the financial hit in the name of veterans.

“This company, worth more than $50 billion, can’t encourage users to donate to this excellent cause without charging them for their time?” Lazzaro wrote. “The thing is, if another company did this, it would likely go unnoticed. But it’s just so, Uber-ish.”

In a blog post on Veterans’ Day, Uber wrote it will contribute an estimated 10,000 rides, which it says is worth $125,000, across five veterans organizations affiliated with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program.

Those rides will provide on-demand transportation to jobs, interviews, and other employment events.

“We’re proud to strengthen our commitment to you, and we salute you this Veterans Day and every day,” Uber wrote in its blog post.
charityTransitUberVeterans Day

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Chase Center and the Golden State Warriors hosted a media Welcome Back conference to discuss the safety protocols and amenities when fans return for a basketball game on April 23rd at Chase Center on April 13, 2021 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Golden State Warriors ready to welcome fans back to Chase Center

COVID-19 tests, app-based food ordering among new safety protocols announced this week

People came out in numbers to memorialize George Floyd, who was fatally shot by police, outside San Francisco City Hall on June 9, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFPD prepares for possible protests as Chauvin trial continues

Police to schedule community meetings, provide officers with crowd control training

Mayor London Breed said Tuesday that with other counties moving ahead with expanding vaccine eligibility “we want San Franciscans to have the same opportunity.” (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Everyone in SF ages 16 and up is now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine

San Francisco expanded eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday to everyone ages… Continue reading

San Francisco Park Rangers have seen their budget and staffing levels increase significantly since 2014. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Citations for being in SF’s public parks after midnight soar

Data shows disproportionate impact on Black residents

Central City SRO Collective tenant leader Reggie Reed, left, and Eddie Ahn, executive director of Brightline Defense, were among those distributing environmental awareness posters throughout the Tenderloin, Mid-Market and South of Market neighborhoods. (Courtesy Central City SRO Collaborative)
Environmental dangers are connected to racism

Let’s attack problems with better policies, greater awareness

Most Read