Two teens escape low-security facility

Two 17-year-old boys picked up their bags and walked out of a juvenile probation camp Thursday afternoon near La Honda, located in the hills south of Redwood City in unincorporated San Mateo County.

The facility for delinquent boys, Camp Glenwood, does not lock the juveniles in and does not have a fence, so such escapes occur about five or six times a year, said <a title=”Stew Peterson” href=”/Subject-Stew_Peterson.html” target=”_blank” onClick=”var s=s_gi('examinercom'); s.tl(this,'o','Entity Link'); ” >Stew Peterson, deputy director of the San Mateo County Probation Department, which runs the facility. Usually, the boys are found or return to the facility quickly, he said, because there are only two roads “to civilization.”

The wooded terrain around the facility is rugged and riddled with poison oak, Sheriff’s Office Lt. Marc Alcantara said.

The two boys are described as black with short hair and blue jeans, one with a green shirt and the other with a yellow shirt. One boy is in the county’s custody for robbery and the other is there for making terrorist threats, Alcantara said.

Neither is considered a danger to the community, Peterson said.

The two boys are now classified AWOL rather than escaped. However, once they return to the facility, they will be charged with the crime of escape and sent back to the county’s juvenile detention facility, Peterson said.

The camp currently hosts about 56 boys, who are placed there for six to nine months. Boys who are sent there have generally not done well in other county programs, but are not considered a threat to the community, so they are given a great degree of freedom.

This inevitably leads to some “escapes,” particularly among boys who are relatively new.

kworth@sfexaminer.com

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