A police car outside Balboa High School on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Two charged in SoMa killing

Two suspects arrested in connection with the killing of a 35-year-old man who was struck over the head and beaten in South of Market will face charges, prosecutors said Wednesday.

Michael Stables, 26, has been charged with murder, attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon in the Oct. 4 attack on Mission Street between Fifth and Sixth streets that killed San Mateo County resident Orlando Echeagaray, according to the District Attorney’s Office.

Carolina Hernandez, 20, has been charged with being an accessory after the fact.

The attempted murder charge against Stables is related to a second victim who was injured in the incident, the District Attorney’s Office said.

Echeagaray was walking in the area at around 4:30 a.m. when two suspects drove up on him and one person in the vehicle fatally struck him in the head with an edged weapon, police said.

At least one suspect then exited the vehicle and struck him numerous times.

Officers who responded to the scene found Echeagaray on the sidewalk with a large laceration to his head.

Echeagaray was unconscious but still alive. He was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, where he later died.

Investigators looking into the attack recovered surveillance footage and found at least one witness, according to police.

Stables and Hernandez were arrested Saturday by Redwood City Police.

They were both taken to San Francisco and booked into County Jail.

Jail records show Stables remains in custody without bail, while Hernandez appears to have been released.

At the Police Commission last Wednesday, Police Chief Bill Scott released details about the homicide and described the killing as an instance of “random violence.”

He said the people involved are not believed to have known each other but were involved in a “dispute that just got out of control.”

The killing marked the 35th homicide of the year in San Francisco amid a sharp uptick in deadly violence.

The City had 25 killings as of Oct. 7, 2019, according to Scott. San Francisco also managed to end last year with a decades-low record of 41 killings.

The most recent killing this year before the Echeagaray homicide was a “robbery gone bad” that happened on Oct. 1, Scott said.

Vermond Jones, a 21-year-old resident of San Francisco, was fatally shot when he tried to rob someone near Union Square, according to authorities.

Jones was one of several robbery suspects armed with handguns who engaged in a struggle with a 31-year-old man near Geary and Stockton streets.

The man managed to grab hold one of the guns during the struggle and fatally shot Jones. The other two suspects got away.

“We are working to identify and bring the other suspects into custody,” Scott said. “Really unfortunate situation all around. Our victim luckily was not injured and did not lose his life as well.”

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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