Tune in Monday night for 'Bait Car'

You can catch footage of people rooting through a car in San Francisco starting Monday night.

The San Francisco Police Department partnered with KKI Productions for a show on Tru-TV.

The segments of “Bait Car” will begin airing Monday night.

The Police Department recently conducted a series of stings, according to a press release from the agency. It parked the vehicles a total of 163 times, and officers arrest 32 male suspects, including two juveniles, during the operation. All of the adult suspects had prior arrest records, according to police.

The Police Department said its “objectives in partnering with Tru-TV were to educate the public on how to prevent having their cars stolen, to reduce crime and to deter future crimes from happening.”

In addition to “education,” the police also seized drugs during the operations, which have raised questions about the use of bait cars.

The suspects in the recorded cases also face charges, police say, with the District Attorney’s Office having filed charges in all of the cases except for two. Those people were on parole and sent back to prison for their starring roles.

The issue behind the bait car may be that not everyone who is caught on film is a car thief.

“In the majority of cases, a thoughtful local resident called the police, gave the keys to a nearby store owner, or took the keys, leaving a note with contact information,” according to police. “In two cases, a citizen moved the car and parked it in a safe area.  These two citizens were detained and released when police determined they had no intention to steal it.”

In addition, the Police Department now gets to keep the car that was used in the filming once the title is transferred, according to the department.

In case you cannot catch the show Monday night, you can watch episodes of “Bait Car” online.

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