Trustees considering parcel tax

PACIFICA — Drawing on reserves and grant money in recent years, the Pacifica School District will likely go out for a parcel tax on the city’s property owners to make up for inequities in state funding.

Local real estate agents are hesitant about the tax’s potential success at the polls and questioned whether it was the best way to bring funds to the district’s coffers. However, District Superintendent Jim Lianides said officials are hopeful that the recent approval of the Jefferson Union High School District bond measure was “symbolic of the community’s support for education.”

At its Wednesday meeting, the school district board is considering a $96 annual parcel tax over five years that would not differentiate between commercial and residential parcels, Lianides said.

The tax, if passed next May, would bring an estimated $960,000 annually to the district’s budget.

“Either we’re able to get an infusion of extra cash or we’re going to have to initiate cutbacks for next year,” Lianides said, adding that the biggest part of their troubles was “inadequate funding from the state.”

Over the past six years, the district has cut $1.2 million in expenses, all the while continuing to perform at a high level, the superintendent said.

According to data from 2004-2005, Pacifica School District spends the second least of all San Mateo County school districts, spending $6,571 on each of the district’s roughly 3,100 students. It is 10th, however, out of the 23 school districts countywide in the state’s Academic Performance Index.

“We needed to show our community that we were spending their money wisely, which is what we’ve done,” Board President Joan Weideman said when asked why to seek a parcel tax now.

In addition to teacher training, the district wants the parcel tax, if approved, to attract and retain quality teachers, enhance its library services and prevent additional cutbacks to instructional programs, Lianides said.

Paul Benson, a real estate agent with Pacific Coast Real Estate, said he’d most likely support it but he had a “little bit of a sour taste” in his mouth after Measure L, the Rockaway Quarry measure that was voted down.

“Some balanced growth and development will expand the tax base, and that would preclude having a parcel tax for necessary services,” Benson said.

Re/Max Dolphin real estate agent Scott Findlay worried about past public outcry against such taxes, but said that the $96 per parcel tax wouldn’t impact the real estate market.

The Pacifica School District board will consider putting the parcel tax to a May 2007, all-mail ballot at its meeting Wednesday, Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the district offices, 375 Reina del Mar Ave. in Pacifica.

dsmith@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

A felled tree in Sydney G. Walton Square blocks part of a lane on Front Street following Sunday’s storm on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
After the rain: What San Francisco learned from a monster storm

Widespread damage underscored The City’s susceptibility to heavy wind and rain

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
$1.4 trillion ‘blueprint’ would address Bay Area’s housing, transit woes

Analyzing the big ticket proposals in ‘Plan Bay Area 2050’

A felled tree in San Francisco is pictured on Fillmore Street following a major storm that produced high winds and heavy rains on Oct. 24, 2021. (Photo courtesy of Philip Ford)
Storm updates: Rainiest October day in San Francisco history

Rainfall exceeded 10 inches in parts of the Bay Area

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at the SF Dept. of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Most Read