Trio set to be arraigned in killing of Canadian woman, Marin County hiker

The trio accused in the recent killings of a Canadian woman in Golden Gate Park and a hiker in Marin County are scheduled to be arraigned on first-degree murder charges today in Marin County Superior Court.

Morrison Haze Lampley, 23, Sean Michael Angold, 24, and Lila Scott Alligood, 18, all face first-degree murder charges in the deaths of Audrey Carey, 23, and Steve Carter, 67.

Carey’s body, which had a gunshot to the head, was found the morning of Oct. 3 in Golden Gate Park. The night before she had attended the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival in the park. Carter, who was also shot, was found two days later on a Fairfax hiking trail.

The court complaint points to Lampley as the alleged shooter in both deaths, as he’s accused of “personally discharging and using” a handgun. He’s also accused of being a felon in possession of a firearm, having been convicted in San Diego County in July of buying or receiving a stolen vehicle, according to the complaint.

The complaint against the three defendants also includes charges of second degree robbery, vehicle theft, receiving a stolen vehicle and buying or receiving stolen property. The trio are also accused of animal cruelty for allegedly shooting and injuring Carter’s Doberman pinscher.

The murder charges are also enhanced by special circumstances of murder lying in wait and murder while involved in a robbery, according to the Marin County District Attorney’s Office.

The defendants allegedly used a gun stolen from a car in the area of Fisherman’s Wharf in both homicides. The trio were arrested in Oregon last week.

If convicted, they could face life in prison or the death penalty.

Michael Barba contributed to reporting.

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