Trio charged with bribery in political corruption case in custody

Three people linked to a pay to play bribery scheme linked to Mayor Ed Lee turned themselves in Monday and were booked into County Jail, following the District Attorney’s Office announcement last week of corruption charges against them.

Keith Jackson, former San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education president, turned himself in at 10 a.m. Monday to officials at the District Attorney’s Office, according to the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department.

Meanwhile, former Human Rights Commission staffer Zula Jones and former Commissioner Nazly Mojaher were taken into custody around 2 p.m. Monday.

Their arraignment dates have yet to be set.

On Friday, George Gascon announced he had charged the three with “soliciting and accepting $20,000 in bribes from an undercover FBI agent in exchange for promised political access and preferential treatment in connection with city contracts.”

The charging documents were sealed as part of a federal protective order.

While the District Attorney’s Office would not say what case the charges emerged from (a federal protective order gives them little wiggle room on the matter) some insiders are clear it’s the Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow case.

Documents released in August first named Jones and Mohajer in conjunction with allegations of campaign money laundering. Jackson had already been charged and was at the center of the case.

Curtis Briggs, whose August filing in the Chow case detailed the trio’s acts on behalf of Mayor Ed Lee, said that it’s obvious the new charges emerged from the Chow case.

In that instance, the pair, along with Jackson, were caught up in an FBI investigation into political corruption, according to court records released in August. FBI wire taps recorded them speaking with an undercover FBI agent on how to launder campaign contributions so they could exceed legal limits. In exchange, the implicit understanding was that campaign contributions would be returned with preferential treatment.

Both women at the time were working to raise funds for Mayor Lee, who has denied any wrongdoing in connection to the case.

Jackson, who pleaded to racketeering and other charges in a federal case against himself and former State Sen. Leland Yee, is set to be sentenced Feb. 10.

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Read more criminal justice news on the Crime Ink page in print. Follow us on Twitter: @sfcrimeinkbriberyCrimeEd LeeGeorge GasconKeith JacksonLeland YeeNazly MohajerRaymond Shrimp Boy ChowSan Francisco JailZula Jones

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