Early Sunday morning, Sept. 4, a fire was reported on Hippie Hill in Golden Gate Park. In April, approximately 20,000 people gathered on Hippie Hill in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park to celebrate Marijuana on 4/20: National Weed Day, Wednesday, April 20, 2016. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F.Examiner)

Early Sunday morning, Sept. 4, a fire was reported on Hippie Hill in Golden Gate Park. In April, approximately 20,000 people gathered on Hippie Hill in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park to celebrate Marijuana on 4/20: National Weed Day, Wednesday, April 20, 2016. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F.Examiner)

Tree on fire at Hippie Hill early Sunday morning, and for once it wasn’t a blunt

A small fire in Golden Gate Park had the San Francisco Fire Department scrambling at early Sunday morning.

Someone called in a “tree on fire” at the park’s famous 420 hangout, Hippie Hill.

And no, it wasn’t that kind of “tree.”

SFFD dispatch said 100 square feet of brush as well as a tree were aflame. Two fire engines arrived and the fire was out by 2:35 a.m., just 15 minutes after the initial call.

Resting a stone’s throw west of Golden Gate Park’s entrance at Haight and Stanyan streets, Hippie Hill is a magnet for cannabis smokers most of the year, and especially on April 20, the marijuana holiday “420.”

It’s also near a part of the park where the San Francisco Police Department Park Station frequently rousts illegal campers, according to SFPD crime recaps.

SFFD spokesperson Jonathan Baxter said there was “nothing suspicious at all,” and that the fire was “accidental not nefarious.”

That section of Golden Gate Park is within the district of Board of Supervisors President London Breed. Breed’s aide, Conor Johnston, said, “We hate to see parks damaged” and the office is “grateful no one was hurt.”

But the fire was odd, he remarked, because “frankly, there’s usually a different kind of plant burning there.”4/20fireGolden Gate ParkHippie Hill

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