Trash can enforcement is garbage, S.F. supe says

Homeowners, beware: Trash cans left on the street 24 hours after garbage collection will result in penalties as high as $300.

A city law passed last year requires trash cans to be kept out of public view, but some residents say the city department in charge of enforcing the law has been slow to do so.

Only nine citations have been issued in the last 90 days.

Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, who introduced the legislation, said that a year later there remains a blight from the “tens of thousands” of trash cans still being left “all over the place” in public view.

The city law authorizes the Department of Public Works to issue citations to offenders, ranging from $80 for first offense to as much as $300 for repeat offenses.

“It’s been at least a year since we passed this thing and we need to get some implementation very soon,” McGoldrick said, during a Thursday Board of Supervisors committee hearing about enforcement of the law.

Dan McKenna of the Department of Public Works said the department began outreach about the law in the late spring, which included a newsletter from The City’s garbage collection company to 160,000 account holders informing that trash cans must be kept out of sight. McKenna said results are beginning to be noticeable.

During the last 90 days, the department has responded to 280 complaints and issued 502 warning notices, he said, and the department has also issued nine citations to those who failed to take cans off of the sidewalks.

DPW also plans on putting on its Web site in the next few days guidelines for acceptable storage of the cans, for instance, within an appropriate enclosure on private property.

“A lot of folks that could take them in out of sight are just leaving them out there and they have places they can store them,” McGoldrick said

jsabatini@examiner.com


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