Transportation task force pushes for $10.1B investment in SFMTA

Mayor Ed Lee’s 2030 Transportation Task Force on Monday recommended a $10.1 billion allocation over the next 15 years for The City’s transit system, saying years of underinvestment have left the Muni system with an outdated infrastructure.

The task force, which Lee announced in his 2013 State of the City address, issued a report finding that the transit system’s services were in jeopardy of declining severely without new investments to meet the growing population and demand.

With only $3.8 billion in funding identified and a $6.3 billion gap over the next 15 years, the panel has urged city officials to push nearly $3 billion in taxes, fees and bonds before voters.

The measures include a raise in the vehicle license fee by 1.35 percent to 2 percent in November 2014, a sales-tax increase of 0.5 percent in November 2016, and $500 million in general obligation bonds in November 2014 and November 2024.

“We all want it to run well. It helps quality of life of The City, helps the economy. It’s a critical part of San Francisco,” Supervisor Scott Wiener, a task force member, said of the system. “And we have to be willing to pay for it.”

The plan would, among other things, allow the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to replace its entire fleet within 15 years and enable The City to reach and maintain good condition of its streets, two areas that residents often complain about.

“These recommendations really are the reckoning to say, ‘OK, The City has been negligent in the past to let it deteriorate, but stop letting it deteriorate and invest in it,’” Wiener said. “And put our money where our mouth is when it comes to being a transit-first city.”

Key components of the plan

$2.7 billion would be invested in citywide programs for improvements in transportation, commercial districts and neighborhoods

$316 million for bike and pedestrian strategies, which plan for a 50 percent reduction in fatalities and injuries for those who walk and boosting cycling trips to 20 percent

$421 million in projects that include an expanded bike network, streetscape improvement and additional Muni vehicles

Source: Mayor’s 2030 Transportation Task ForceBay Area NewsTransittransportation

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