Six large jacks hold up the weight of the bus deck at the Salesforce Transit Center on Monday, Oct. 1, 2018. The jacks sit atop four steel girders and a wooden mat that will be a part of a shoring system that will be installed so that weight will be completely taken off two cracked steel girders that sit above the bus deck. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Transit Center fix delays push Fremont Street reopening to next week

Work to shore up the Salesforce Transit Center has hit a snag, delaying the re-opening of Fremont Street until next week.

That’s according to the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, the entity responsible for overseeing the transit center that is leading repairs and analysis after two cracks were discovered in two steel beams in late September. Those cracked beams were directly over Fremont Street, leading the agency’s officials to shore up the transit center with six oversize jacks, much like one would use on a car, to strengthen the building’s foundation.

Initially officials said Fremont Street would reopen by Friday, October 12, but that has now been postponed to Wednesday Oct. 17. The delay is due to “the complexity of the four-level designed shoring system,” the TJPA said in a statement. Work on that shoring system will continue through the weekend and into early next week.

“It is important that we have an extremely robust shoring system to ensure that all levels of the transit center are safe and secure. Unfortunately, this requires us to keep the street closed until this work is complete. We will reopen Fremont Street as soon as safely possible and apologize for the ongoing impact to the public,” said Mark Zabaneh, executive director of the TJPA, in a statement.

The $2.2 billion transit center has been closed since late September. The cracked steel beams were made by Stockton-based Herrick Corp, which also provided the equipment to support the weight of the transit center bus deck.

It is still an open question who will ultimately pay for the transit center’s repairs. Though Zabaneh said publicly the building was under “warranty,” he later told the San Francisco Examiner that ongoing testing — meant to investigate what caused the cracks in the steel beams — would determine who pays.

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