Town hall set after officer-involved shooting

Courtesy PhotoThe Tec-9 pistol the suspect had on him during the officer involved shooting last Thursday night.

Courtesy PhotoThe Tec-9 pistol the suspect had on him during the officer involved shooting last Thursday night.

San Francisco police Chief Greg Suhr will hold a town hall meeting today to discuss a nonfatal officer-involved shooting that led to rowdy demonstrations in the Mission district, including the vandalizing of a police station.

A plainclothes police officer shot a parolee Thursday night who had reportedly pointed a Tec-9 gun at the officer — an incident that sparked two nights of protests in the Mission district.

More than two hours after the gunfire erupted Thursday night, an enraged protester spray-painted “killers” at the entrance to the Mission Police Station on Valencia Street. Protesters also marched around the area that night, leading to the closure of the 16th Street BART station, though no other vandalism occurred.

On Friday night, protesters returned to the area, marching through the Mission and vandalizing banks, breaking windows and spray-painting.

The officer-involved shooting at 14th and Minna streets began when officers were searching for youths on probation who were out past curfew — part of the Juvenile Probation Department program Operation Night Light.

While driving down 14th Street near Natoma Street, police said, the officers stopped when they saw the 22-year-old, who they knew to be a gang member and parolee. The suspect started running westbound on 14th Street, Sgt. Michael Andraychak said, and during the chase he pulled out the Tec-9. Despite an officer’s command to drop the weapon, Andraychak said, the suspect turned toward the officer and began to raise the pistol. For fear of his life, police said, the officer opened fire and hit the suspect twice. The man was transported to San Francisco General Hospital and treated for injuries that were not life-threatening.

On Friday, police released more information about the 22-year-old suspect, whom they did not identify, including the fact that he is a known gang member with a past conviction for assault with a firearm. They also released images of the loaded machine gun pistol that was allegedly raised at an officer.

Police said they have witnesses who corroborated their account.

“We will also be going back at some point to do a secondary canvass of the neighborhood to identify additional witnesses,” Andraychak said.

The town hall with Suhr is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. at the Cornerstone Church at 2459 17th St.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

Bay City News contributed to this report.

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsLocalMission districtSan Francisco Police Department

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