Three Oakland teens sentenced for Halloween killing

Three teenage Oakland boys were sentenced today for being aiders and abettors in the shooting death of 15-year-old Ichinkhorloo “Iko” Bayarsaikhan in Alameda on Halloween night.

Alameda County Juvenile Court Judge Rhonda Burgess sentenced a 16-year-old boy who has a prior criminal record to at least seven years at the California Youth Authority.

The boy could be held a maximum of nine years, until the age of 25.

Burgesssaid a structured wilderness camp in Nevada would be a more appropriate placement for the 16-year-old boy's 15-year-old brother, as well as for a 13-year-old boy who also participated in the crime.

Burgess will make a final decision on where those two boys will be placed in two weeks, after court officials consult the wilderness camp and alternative programs.

The 15-year-old and 13-year-old will be placed at a facility for at least two years, and possibly up until they turn 19.

Iko was killed at about 10 p.m. on Oct. 31 at Washington Park at 799 Central Ave. in Alameda while she and a group of about 10 friends were being robbed by a large group of suspects, according to Alameda police.

Authorities charged six suspects in connection with the incident.

The three boys who were sentenced today didn't fire any shots, but were charged with murder because they participated in the robbery that resulted in the fatal shooting.

Quochuy Tran, a 16-year-old Oakland High School student, has been charged as an adult and could face life in prison if he is convicted because authorities believe he fired the shot that took Iko's life.

Two other boys who also allegedly handled the gun that night are charged as juveniles, but prosecutors are still considering charging them as adults.

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