The skies have it: Summer appears to be on its way

Nary a coat nor a closed-toe shoe could be found in downtown San Francisco on Sunday, as tourists, employees and city weekenders enjoyed the first signs of summer.

The Bay Area is expected to see highs in the upper low 70s early this week on the coast with temperatures hitting the mid-80s inland, with warm winds of 5 to 10 miles per hour.

National Weather Service forecaster Diana Henderson said temperatures hit a high of 80 on Sunday in The City, with a peak this week of 85 expected today. Temperatures are expected to dip slightly midweek, but the mercury should remain in the 80s all week, Henderson said.

Beachcombers can also enjoy the weather on the coast, which is also expected to hit the low 70s early this week. Midweek, though, temperatures are expected to dip into the 60s along the water, Henderson said.

“It’s starting to look like summer,” Henderson said.

Though the state saw a relatively dry and calm winter, a number of San Franciscans said Sunday that they were ready for summer to arrive in earnest.

Elena Iannetti, resident of the Paramount on Mission Street, spent much of the morning and afternoon at the pool, lounging and tanning with a friend. She said she was happy that the weather has turned warmer.

“Finally,” Iannetti said. “I love it.”

Oakland resident Marco Barone dropped into San Francisco on Sunday, his day off, to visit a bookstore and wander around. He said he’s looking forward to a warm week, although he joked it may cause his productivity to take a hit.

“I sit right next to a window and can see it all day,” Barone said. “It’s going to be tough to stay focused right when the weather gets gorgeous.”

Whenever there is a shift in the weather, ne’er-do-wells also seem to come out of the woodwork and start causing trouble, according to South San Francisco police Officer Sharon Cervelli.

While this weekend has been relatively quiet for South San Francisco, Cervelli said that the police keep an especially watchful eye on criminal activity once the weather changes.

“It does get busier for us,” Cervelli said. “People get drunk, people do crazy things when it’s nice out.”

tramroop@examiner.com

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