The 3-minute interview with Joan Rivers

Iconic comedian Joan Rivers, 74, is in The City, presenting workshop performances of her new autobiographical play “The Joan Rivers Theatre Project” at the Magic Theatre as well as performing her stand-up act at the Plush Room. She chatted on the phone with The Examiner recently while having her nails done.

Why did you bring your show to San Francisco? I think the audiences here are so smart. There are straight smarties, and gay smarties.

Where are you hanging out during your stay? At the Magic, rehearsing.

What are you wearing? A Galliano leather jacket; I look like a lesbian Jewish biker. Chanel slacks. I don’t know who the top is, and, of course, Manolos. I knew Manolo when he had his little store back in the ’70s.

How’s Melissa? She fabulous. She’s doing a radio show.

What’s going on with your jewelry line? I’ve been in business 17 years — I’m like Joan Crawford!

To what do you attribute your longevity in show business? Doing anything. Trying anything. I never say “no.”

Are there other comedians whose work you admire? I don’t follow them too closely. We all seem to talk about the same kinds of things. But, of, course, there’s Sarah Silverman. And Kathy Griffin — we go way back.

What are you looking forward to? Everything! I haven’t peaked. I’m still working on my “I’ll show them” high school energy.

lkatz@examiner.com


Check out more 3-minute interviews from our San Francisco newsroom.

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