The 3-minute interview with Greg Proops

The 48-year-old comedian with the thick spectacles and poofy pompadour, bestknown for his appearances on the improvisational comedy show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?,” is performing at the Punch Line Comedy Club in San Francisco tonight through Saturday. Raised in San Carlos and currently living in Los Angeles, he said he became his own guidance counselor during his days at San Francisco State University, quit his acting studies and became a full-time funnyman.

So what was your San Carlos upbringing like? Well, oppressive. I couldn’t wait to leave. It was a normal white suburban upbringing. It was in the ’70s. I couldn’t wait to move to San Francisco.

With all of the controversy surrounding San Francisco officials recently, who would you poke fun at in your stand-up act? Maybe that suspended supervisor Ed Jew, but he’s not as funny as Gavin. He’s not as sexy. Gavin’s very tall for a mayor. [Los Angeles Mayor Antonio] Villaraigosa is extremely short, so Gavin has the reach on him and the weight, but if they had a match in the ring, I’d put my money on Gavin. But they both do get around, if you know what I mean.

How are San Francisco crowds different from other cities? I love the San Francisco crowd. They’re really hip, right? They have a lot of sass and they can keep up with me. And of course the politics. I take their poisoning politics with me wherever I tour.

Poisoning politics? The reason I say it’s poisoning is that once you leave the leftist San Francisco, it gets a little rednecky. It’s just not the same. And right on. I love San Francisco’s label.


Check out more 3-minute interviews from our San Francisco newsroom.

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