The 3-minute interview with Dana Ullman

The Berkeley-based writer and researcher is a national spokesman for homeopathic medicine whose latest book is “The Homeopathic Revolution: Why Famous People and Cultural Heroes Choose Homeopathy.” He will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Garden Room of Building 10 at UC Berkeley’s Clark Kerr Campus,2601 Warring St.

What is homeopathy? It’s a type of natural medicine that works to stimulate the body’s own defense systems.

How is it different from conventional medicine? It doesn’t suppress symptoms, which are defenses of the body and mind. Homeopathic medicines use symptoms to augment the sick person’s own immune system.

What are homeopathic medicines? They’re plants, mineral and animal substances that are taken in nano — small yet powerful — doses.

Why did you write the book? When Coretta Scott King died, it was announced that she was seeking homeopathic treatment in Mexico. I wanted to connect the dots between the hundreds of our most respected cultural heroes who used homeopathic treatments.

Who are some people whose health has improved from homeopathic treatments? Eleven American presidents, seven popes. Then there’s Tina Turner, who had tuberculosis, and Cher, who had chronic fatigue and pneumonia.

Of the dozens of people profiled in your book, whose story did you find the most interesting? Charles Darwin, who suffered from fainting spells, saw spots in front of his eyes and had consistent nausea. I uncovered details of his life that reveal that he wouldn’t have written “The Origin of Species” if he hadn’t had homeopathic treatments.

lkatz@examiner.com


Check out more 3-minute interviews from our San Francisco newsroom.

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